What options can I consider for my unplanned pregnancy?

Pact believes that pregnant women (and their partners) should have choices when facing an unplanned pregnancy, and that women of color who are considering adoption are too often denied access to the pregnancy options available to their white counterparts. Pact will offer you information and support whether you decide adoption is right for your baby or not.

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Will anyone want to adopt my African American baby?

At Pact we have many families eager to adopt an African American or biracial baby. Most of these families are African American themselves or interracial couples. If you decide adoption is the best thing for your baby, you have options. Many people want to adopt and no two are alike. There are couples—and singles. Some are the same race as your baby—others adopt across racial lines. Some do not yet have any children—others have kids already. Some want to have a lot of contact with you—others won't. Choosing the right adoptive family to adopt your baby will depend on your requirements. We can help you think through your choices and connect to a family of your choosing.

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Will anyone want to adopt my Latino (Hispanic) baby?

At Pact we have many families eager to adopt a Latino or mixed-race baby. Most of these families are Latino themselves or interracial couples. If you decide adoption is the best thing for your baby, you have options. Many people want to adopt and no two are alike. There are couples—and singles. Some are the same ethnicity as your baby—others adopt across ethnic or racial lines. Some do not yet have any children—others have kids already. Some want to have a lot of contact with you—others won't. Choosing the right adoptive family to adopt your baby will depend on your requirements. We can help you think through your choices and connect to a family of your choosing.

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Will anyone want to adopt my Asian/Pacific Islander baby?

At Pact we have many families eager to adopt an Asian/Pacific Islander or mixed-race baby. Most of these families are Asian or Pacific Islander themselves or interracial couples. If you decide adoption is the best thing you’re your baby, you have options. Many people want to adopt and no two are alike. There are couples—and singles. Some are the same race as your baby—others adopt across racial lines. Some do not yet have any children—others have kids already. Some want to have a lot of contact with you—others won't. Choosing the right adoptive family to adopt your baby will depend on your requirements. We can help you think through your choices and connect to a family of your choosing.

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What are adoptive parents like?

The majority of the adoptive parents contacting us are in good health, college-educated, over 35, financially stable, infertile, and scared that you will change your mind. Thirty-five percent are interracial couples, 30% are African American, 15% are Latino, 10% are Asian, and 10% are Caucasian. Seventy percent are married couples, 15% are single, and 15% are gay or lesbian. Learn more about our waiting families.

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Who are the expectant parents Pact works with?

Twenty percent of the expectant parents we work with are teens; 80% are under the age of 30; 90% are experiencing economic stress and 70% are currently parenting other children. Many feel isolated and unsupported. Sometimes, Pact is their sole source of emotional support. We are there for expectant and birth parents through every step of the decision-making process as they face an unplanned pregnancy, always understanding that this is a major turning point in their lives.

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How much do adoption services cost?

All adoption services are free to expectant and birth parents. Adoptive parents pay fees to adoption professionals and in some states they may also assist with specific expenses related to the pregnancy of the birth parents. Adoptive parents may pay for counseling, medical costs, legal costs, transportation, and living expenses related to your pregnancy. You are entitled to ask the professionals with whom you work about the fees they charge adoptive parents. Pact charges adoptive parents a single fee for all services on a sliding scale.

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Can I meet the adoptive family? Can I see the baby?

You are in charge of what happens. We want you to consider the advantages of seeing the baby, but it is not required. We will help you and the adoptive parents decide together on the kind of contact you will have after the placement. We believe that children do best when connections with their birth family members are maintained. Many birth parents tell us that it has helped their own healing process to remain in some form of contact with their child after placement.

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Will my child hate me if I choose adoption?

Your child will want to understand why. He or she will want to know that you acted in his or her best interest. The most important information will be the knowledge that you worked very hard to make the right decision, that you considered his or her needs before your own.

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How do I know who will be good adoptive parents?

Adoptive parents must be approved by a state-required home-study and must undergo a criminal record search. Some do this before you choose them and others afterwards. Adopters working with Pact are required to attend workshops and counseling sessions that prepare them to be successful parents. In a Pact adoption, we believe in full disclosure of all information about both sets of parents to each other. You will usually be able to talk with them and meet them (often at the time of the birth), so you can decide for yourself. There are never guarantees in life, but we will give you tools to make an informed choice and opportunities to get your questions about the family answered.

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What if I change my mind?

This will almost certainly be the hardest decision you will ever make. Since you will be deciding not only for yourself but for your baby and the adoptive parents, we will ask you to be as sure as you can possibly be that adoption is the right plan before you select an adoptive family. Nevertheless, you will retain the legal right to change your mind and reclaim custody without explanation until you sign the consent to the adoption after the birth of your baby. Once you sign the consent forms, you have some period of time (depending on which state you live in) before your signature will be considered irrevocable. You will continue to have the right to a legal hearing of the matter even after this period has passed. We will always help you to get the specific information you need if you want to explore these options.

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What kinds of adoption papers will I have to sign?

There are 5 papers in total: (1) a contract to work with Pact on your adoption plan; (2) a form reflecting your intent to place your child for adoption with a particular adoptive family (this form is not legally binding); (3) a form you will sign at the hospital to give the adoptive parents the right to make medical decisions for the child while he or she is in their custody; (4) a consent or relinquishment form you will sign after the birth of your baby that will mean you are giving up your legal right to parent your child; and (5) a memo of understanding form, which Pact will help you design, regarding agreements about ongoing contact.

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Who do I contact to get started right away?

Please feel free to call our toll-free Birth Parents Line at 800-750-7590, or email us at adoptions@pactadopt.org, and let us know the best way to reach you

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